New nonfiction on my TBR

The glory of Nonfiction November is learning about all the great nonfiction books a person somehow missed and really must read. This is a terrible, wonderful thing. So many books! So our final post of the month is about the expansion of our already burgeoning TBR lists. 

New to My TBR, hosted by Rennie from What’s Nonfiction: It’s been a month full of amazing nonfiction books! Which ones have made it onto your TBR? Be sure to link back to the original blogger who posted about that book!

Here are the books I’ve added to my TBR this month, with thanks to the wonderful book bloggers who wrote such glorious and enticing reviews.

Shoot for the Moon by James Donovan 
Recommended by JulzReads

Failure Is Not an Option by Gene Kranz  
Recommended by Never Enough Novels

Design Your Next Chapter by Debbie Travis 
Recommended by Beverley A. Baird

Save Me the Plums by Ruth Reichl 
Recommended by The Book Stop

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone
Recommended by booksaremyfavouriteandbest

The Wisdom of the Enneagram 
Recommended by Lisa Notes

Home Sweet Maison by Danielle Postel-Vinay
The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning by Margareta Magnusson 
Recommended by Susan of Blue-Hearted Bookworm

Houseworks by Cynthia Ewer 
Recommended by Amy 

At Home with Books by Estelle Ellis
Recommended by Head Subhead

 

My fellow nonfiction fans… what books did Nonfiction November add to the top of your TBR?

Nonfiction favorites: what makes me love nonfiction

Nonfiction November continues….  Here’s this week’s installment.

Nonfiction Favorites, hosted by Leann at ShelfAware: We’ve talked about how you pick nonfiction books in previous years, but this week I’m excited to talk about what makes a book you’ve read one of your favorites. Is the topic pretty much all that matters? Are there particular ways a story can be told or particular writing styles that you love? Do you look for a light, humorous approach or do you prefer a more serious tone? Let us know what qualities make you add a nonfiction book to your list of favorites.

I seriously love a unique and authentic voice in nonfiction. So this usually means I have a soft spot for memoirs, since they’re the nonfiction most likely to be narrated in an author’s own voice. This year, the standout memoirs I’ve read include…

Working by Robert A. Caro   
Caro’s self-deprecating humor delights me, especially since the dude’s one of the preeminent biographers of all time.

 

Textbook Amy Krouse Rosenthal by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
The quirkiness of this book–and the author’s sheer joy in living–make me smile every time I think of it.

 

I Miss You When I Blink by Mary Laura Philpott
Philpott’s a master of the personal essay, and she’ll catch you by surprise every now and then. 

 

Good Talk by Mira Jacob
Jacob’s wry humor and the unique format of her memoir (a graphic novel told in conversations) create one of the most remarkable reading experiences I’ve ever had. 

 

What makes you fall in love with a nonfiction book? 

Home organization books… asking the expert

On today’s episode of Nonfiction November, we’re talking about Expertise.

Be The Expert/Ask the Expert/Become the Expert, hosted by Katie at Doing Dewey: Three ways to join in this week! You can either share 3 or more books on a single topic that you have read and can recommend (be the expert), you can put the call out for good nonfiction on a specific topic that you have been dying to read (ask the expert), or you can create your own list of books on a topic that you’d like to read (become the expert).

 

Anyone else completely hooked on home organization books? If so, let’s talk!

Last spring, I posted a list of my favorite books about home organization, and I’m always looking for more ideas.

Here are some examples of books I’ve read, loved, and lived…

My fellow organizing wonders… I’d love to hear which home organization books are your favorites! Please share your suggestions in the Comments… I’m all ears.

If you love British TV…

Bingeworthy British Television: The Best Brit TV You Can’t Stop Watching by Sarah Cords and Jackie Bailey

3 words: enthusiastic, lively, knowledgeable

Bingeworthy British TV

 

When a person who’s a reluctant television watcher gets this excited about dipping into a book about TV shows, you know the book’s pretty remarkable. 

 

When I first learned about the publication of Bingeworthy British Television, I immediately emailed some friends who are serious Watchers of the British TV Series to tell them about it. 

I didn’t realize I was part of the intended audience, but now I know. 

Here’s why this book sucked me in… 

When authors blend a depth of knowledge, enthusiasm for the subject, and an engaging writing style, they’ve got me. Cords does all of those things. 

By the time I was 25% through the book, I was in awe of the amount of TV viewing and research that went into this book’s creation. You’re seriously in good hands here: Cords knows her British TV. (We already knew that from her blog, The Great British TV Site, but it’s abundantly clear in this book.)

I also started jotting down TV series I want to watch. While I tell myself I don’t really watch TV, I have a Downton Abbey habit. And a Sherlock thing. And a history of Foyle’s War viewing. And a weakness for The Crown. And now I have a list that contains Detectorists and Mr. Selfridge and Moone Boy.

My librarian’s heart was made happy by these words at the end of each TV show’s section: “What to Binge on Next.” She provides watch-alikes! (I think I just coined a term.) I was so over-excited by this, I took a photo of that section to text to a friend who’s wild about Being Human. For librarians serving patrons who love love love British TV shows, this book’s a godsend. When your Downton Abbey viewers are sad that the series has ended, open to page 124 for some suggestions for them.  

This book also made me laugh with delight. Because it contains sentences like this: 

“Basil Fawlty, proprietor of the hotel Fawlty Towers, is everything you don’t want in your hospitality staff: excitable, eccentric, violent, and violently snobbish.” (p. 22)

And this: 

“When housewife and mother Alison Braithwaite wins thirty-eight million pounds in the lottery, the first thing she doesn’t do is tell her family.” (p. 74) 

When this depth of knowledge is delivered with warmth and humor and exuberance, you’ve got yourself a book that’s a complete pleasure to read. It’s a wildly pleasant place to hang out. 

Give this book a whirl if you like… British television series, lively writing style, finding TV series similar to your favorites, a warm tone

What are your favorite British TV shows? 

(Review copy provided by the author in exchange for a fair and honest review)

Book pairings: sociopaths

Nonfiction November rages on, and today’s topic is… 

Book Pairing, hosted by Sarah of Sarah’s Bookshelves : This week, pair up a nonfiction book with a fiction title. It can be a “If you loved this book, read this!” or just two titles that you think would go well together. Maybe it’s a historical novel and you’d like to get the real history by reading a nonfiction version of the story.

Today we’re getting grim, my friends, because: sociopaths. 

Yes, we’re talking about the true story of Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos, the totally bogus biotech company she led — and the people whose lives she damaged because they crossed her. It’s creepy, it’s chilling, it’s disturbing as all get-out. And the fact that it’s true makes it all the more unsettling. 

So our nonfiction title today is Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou. 

Bad Blood pairs nicely with My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite. While this novel has a bit of a cheeky tone, it’s suspenseful and all too maddening to watch the sociopathic sister (yes, an actual serial killer) get away with murder. 

Both books contain situations that are downright infuriating, because the gall! The audaciousness of their behavior is shocking. They also both deal with issues of integrity and loyalty and complicity. And both can be deeply disturbing. 

 

So if you’re a sensitive soul, these books are not good for bedtime reading. While they’re not scary, they’re unsettling. (I had a troubled night of sleep after reading a chapter of Bad Blood at bedtime — and afterward would read it only during daylight hours. Because this stuff is true, and it’s seriously messed up.)

 

Anyone else moderately (yet not unpleasantly) disturbed by these books?