Creating a home library

Creating a home library is one of the most fun home improvement projects ever. When we moved into the schoolhouse, we decided pretty fast that the second largest bedroom would become a home library. 

Library 1.0

We moved in the mismatched bookcases that came with us from our old homes, and we put books on the shelves. And we knew that we were not yet done…

Deciding on bookcases...

Then we spent months and months settling in (all those cabinets and drawers to organize!) and the books were accessible, so there wasn’t a sense of urgency. 

Then, once we were all settled, urgency

Actually, just: now we have a clear runway… 

So we began considering options for the home library. After exploring custom built-ins and discovering that was outside our budget, we decided to go basic.

We headed to IKEA.

When we were visiting Nashville, we went to The Book Shop, where the owner told us that she’d bought IKEA Hemnes shelves for her (beautiful) shop.

So when the time came for us to choose shelves, we went with the Hemnes shelves in white. And the cool thing is that they’re available in two sizes, so we could mix and match to fit our space. 

We went with two 35-inch shelves and one 19-inch shelf

There then ensued a weekend of IKEA shelf building… and that super fun extra trip to the IKEA returns department to pick up the one little piece missing from the box.

Successful shelving!

But we got it done, and it was a valiant team effort. (That ability to canoe without bickering also transfers to furniture assembly. We know we’re blessed.)

Before attaching the shelves to the wall, the Dear Man had the excellent idea of attaching the shelves to each other so they’d stay aligned. So we headed to Home Depot to get some brackets that we attached to the top and back of the shelves to hold them in place. Then the Dear Man drilled holes and attached the shelves to the wall. 

Shelving the books...

And then the fun began

Putting books on shelves is one of my favorite projects in the world, and it’s a gift that keeps on giving. I mean, who among us hasn’t decided to rearrange the bookcases just for sport? 

So the current book arrangement is certainly not final, but it’s satisfying. 

And now I’m on the lookout for bookends and other items that will help style the shelves. Styling the shelves is gonna be one of my 20 for 2020 goals, and I’m excited about it.  

Before and After

Advice? Stories?

So, my bookish friends…

Please share your suggestions for styling the bookshelves.

And please tell your stories of book arranging on your shelves… 

Announcing Book Bingo 2020

Welcome to Book Bingo 2020!

It’s our 6th year of producing a bookish bingo card, and every year the best part is that more people are joining in the fun.  

The Theme

This year’s bingo card has a calendar theme, thanks to my dear friend and bingo collaborator, who suggested it. 

So you’ll find the names of months in ghosted text, and the categories on the card are arranged strategically so they can carry us through the seasons of the year. We start out with Icy (for winter), then move to Longing (for spring), then a Road Trip (for summer), and finally Horror (for fall). Every category on the card is placed in its spot for a seasonal reason. 

I won’t be reading books in category order, but if you’re looking for an added level of challenge, you could attempt to read through the year by category — to fully experience the seasonal tone we’ve built in. If you try this, please let me know how it goes!

The Gratitude

Book Bingo is possible because of two of my most favorite people on earth:

  • My dear friend, who loves bingo category creation every bit as much as I do (so much that she created an amazing spreadsheet this year to help us with the planning process; there are few things more pleasing than a good spreadsheet).
  • The Dear Man, who creates the beautiful design of each year’s book bingo card. I love the work that comes out of our home graphic design office. Every year: happiness.

How to Play

  • Read a book that fits the category. Each book can qualify for only one category.
  • Complete just one row or column, or go for blackout by reading a book in every category.
  • All books must be finished in 2020. Books started in 2019 but finished in 2020 count.
  • We’ve provided some definitions, but you can free-style it if you like—as long as you can make a case that the book fits the category.
  • All categories can be fiction or nonfiction (your choice), unless otherwise specified.

The Categories

Icy – A book that takes place in snowy winter, a story featuring a cold-hearted character, or a chilling tale

Landscape – A book whose setting is vital to the story 

Novella – Shorter than a novel, but longer than a short story

Harlem Renaissance – A book written by a Harlem Renaissance author 

Longing – A story filled with yearning, desire, or wistfulness 

Lies & Deception – A book with lies, so many lies. Or a book that deceived you.

Expectations – A story of fulfilled or thwarted expectations, or a book that failed to meet your expectations 

Underdog – A book about a character who defies the odds

Personal Growth – Self-improvement: pragmatically or spiritually

Long Haired Author – A book by an author who has (or had) long hair

A Friend’s Suggestion – Ask a friend what you should read next

Podcast – Listen to a serial podcast or read a book written by a podcaster

Carnegie Medal Nominee – A book nominated for the Carnegie Medal

Modern Classic – A contemporary book that will stand the test of time

Road Trip – Wanderlust, restlessness, desperation, quest? A book with a road trip in it

Olympic Sport – A book with a character who participates (at any level) in a sport featured in the Olympics

Checklist – A book you’re checking off your list, or a book containing a checklist for a better life

South America – A book written by a South American author or a book that takes place in South America

Back to School – A story with a school setting

Love – A book that illustrates love 

Native American – A character or an author who is Native American

Horror – A story that inspires a feeling of dread

Political – Election year! Read something political

Memoir – A nonfiction personal account based on the author’s experience

Indulge – The hot fudge of reading: all pleasure, no virtue

To Sign Up...

Add your blog name & URL in the Comments. Easy as that.

Printable Book Bingo Card

Questions? Answers!

If you have any questions about any of the categories, ask your question in the Comments, and I promise I’ll respond.

Now let’s get out there and Bingo!

What I’ve been reading: November 2019

November’s been a busy month around here: we added shelves to our home library (stay tuned for more on that) and worked on some other projects. And we did some reading.

Here’s a recap of the books I finished this month…  

Bingeworthy British Television: The Best Brit TV You Can’t Stop Watching by Sarah Cords and Jackie Bailey

3 words: enthusiastic, lively, knowledgeable

Give this book a whirl if you like… British television series, lively writing style, finding TV series similar to your favorites, a warm tone



The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

3 words: engaging, rollicking, evocative

Give this book a whirl if you like… tales of rambunctious childhood, storytelling, American classics, childhood classics for adults

 

Coraline by Neil Gaiman

3 words: menacing, clever, pageturner

Give this book a whirl if you like… scary tales of childhood; creepy, dreamlike worlds; the menacing world of one’s own home 

 

Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations by Mira Jacob

3 words: creative, thought-provoking, sad/funny

Give this book a whirl if you like… memoirs in graphic novel form; smart, sad, funny memoirs; #ownvoices; a look at race and ethnicity through personal experience; stories told through conversations with a child, parents, a spouse, and friends

 

Dare to Lead: Brave Work, Tough Conversations, Whole Hearts by Brene Brown

3 words: direct, conversational, empathic

Give this book a whirl if you like… straight talk, the challenge to be one’s best self at work, strategies for becoming a better person and a better leader

 

Everyone’s a Aliebn When Ur a Aliebn Too by Jomny Sun

3 words: endearing, heartfelt, wise

Give this book a whirl if you like… charming graphic novels, a stranger in a strange land, mysteries of humanity, self-improvement books in disguise

 

Steal Like an Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative by Austin Kleon

3 words: inspiring, conversational, practical

Give this book a whirl if you like… creativity, where to find inspiration, how to develop one’s own creative style

 

 

What books were your favorites this month?

New nonfiction on my TBR

The glory of Nonfiction November is learning about all the great nonfiction books a person somehow missed and really must read. This is a terrible, wonderful thing. So many books! So our final post of the month is about the expansion of our already burgeoning TBR lists. 

New to My TBR, hosted by Rennie from What’s Nonfiction: It’s been a month full of amazing nonfiction books! Which ones have made it onto your TBR? Be sure to link back to the original blogger who posted about that book!

Here are the books I’ve added to my TBR this month, with thanks to the wonderful book bloggers who wrote such glorious and enticing reviews.

Shoot for the Moon by James Donovan 
Recommended by JulzReads

Failure Is Not an Option by Gene Kranz  
Recommended by Never Enough Novels

Design Your Next Chapter by Debbie Travis 
Recommended by Beverley A. Baird

Save Me the Plums by Ruth Reichl 
Recommended by The Book Stop

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone
Recommended by booksaremyfavouriteandbest

The Wisdom of the Enneagram 
Recommended by Lisa Notes

Home Sweet Maison by Danielle Postel-Vinay
The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning by Margareta Magnusson 
Recommended by Susan of Blue-Hearted Bookworm

Houseworks by Cynthia Ewer 
Recommended by Amy 

At Home with Books by Estelle Ellis
Recommended by Head Subhead

 

My fellow nonfiction fans… what books did Nonfiction November add to the top of your TBR?

Great bookish gift ideas

It’s nearly the most wonderful time of the year, and that means gift-giving.

If you’ve got bookish people on your list, I’ve got you covered.

Here are some of the best book-related gifts I’ve received or craved… 

Comfy cardigan

The gift I never knew I needed… and now I can’t live without it.

A few Christmases ago, the Dear Man gave me this cardigan, and I wear it nearly every night while reading in bed.

It’s big and slouchy and cozy.

Where to buy:

Similar cardigan available at Eddie Bauer

Add Your Heading Text Here

Slippers

Super snuggly slippers are a must if you live in a cold climate.

Another perfect Christmas gift from the Dear Man.

Where to buy:

Similar slippers available at Pottery Barn

Throw

Another essential element to the cozy reading scene… the super soft throw.

I love this one because:

  • buffalo plaid
  • so snuggly soft

Where to buy:

Pottery Barn

Banned books scarf

I love my banned books scarf and wear it way more often than just Banned Books Week.

Where to buy:

Uncommon Goods

Tote bag

My favorite new book bag and all-around tote.

It’s adorable and tough and made of wool.

Where to buy:

The Big Lake

Giant clothes pin

When reading a huge book like Middlemarch, sometimes you need a helping hand to keep the thing open.

Some like the book weight, but I prefer the giant clothes pin.

I made this one in shop class in 7th grade, so it’s a handcrafted, one-of-a-kind item.   : )

Where to buy:

Similar giant clothes pin on Etsy

Sticky arrows

The perfect bookish stocking stuffer.

I carry these in my purse and have them on my bedside table, because you never know when you’ll need to mark the page of a perfect line or quote.

Where to buy:

Amazon

What’s on your bookish gift-buying (or wish) list this year?

And what’s the best bookish gift you’ve received?