Home organization books… asking the expert

On today’s episode of Nonfiction November, we’re talking about Expertise.

Be The Expert/Ask the Expert/Become the Expert, hosted by Katie at Doing Dewey: Three ways to join in this week! You can either share 3 or more books on a single topic that you have read and can recommend (be the expert), you can put the call out for good nonfiction on a specific topic that you have been dying to read (ask the expert), or you can create your own list of books on a topic that you’d like to read (become the expert).

 

Anyone else completely hooked on home organization books? If so, let’s talk!

Last spring, I posted a list of my favorite books about home organization, and I’m always looking for more ideas.

Here are some examples of books I’ve read, loved, and lived…

My fellow organizing wonders… I’d love to hear which home organization books are your favorites! Please share your suggestions in the Comments… I’m all ears.

If you love British TV…

Bingeworthy British Television: The Best Brit TV You Can’t Stop Watching by Sarah Cords and Jackie Bailey

3 words: enthusiastic, lively, knowledgeable

Bingeworthy British TV

 

When a person who’s a reluctant television watcher gets this excited about dipping into a book about TV shows, you know the book’s pretty remarkable. 

 

When I first learned about the publication of Bingeworthy British Television, I immediately emailed some friends who are serious Watchers of the British TV Series to tell them about it. 

I didn’t realize I was part of the intended audience, but now I know. 

Here’s why this book sucked me in… 

When authors blend a depth of knowledge, enthusiasm for the subject, and an engaging writing style, they’ve got me. Cords does all of those things. 

By the time I was 25% through the book, I was in awe of the amount of TV viewing and research that went into this book’s creation. You’re seriously in good hands here: Cords knows her British TV. (We already knew that from her blog, The Great British TV Site, but it’s abundantly clear in this book.)

I also started jotting down TV series I want to watch. While I tell myself I don’t really watch TV, I have a Downton Abbey habit. And a Sherlock thing. And a history of Foyle’s War viewing. And a weakness for The Crown. And now I have a list that contains Detectorists and Mr. Selfridge and Moone Boy.

My librarian’s heart was made happy by these words at the end of each TV show’s section: “What to Binge on Next.” She provides watch-alikes! (I think I just coined a term.) I was so over-excited by this, I took a photo of that section to text to a friend who’s wild about Being Human. For librarians serving patrons who love love love British TV shows, this book’s a godsend. When your Downton Abbey viewers are sad that the series has ended, open to page 124 for some suggestions for them.  

This book also made me laugh with delight. Because it contains sentences like this: 

“Basil Fawlty, proprietor of the hotel Fawlty Towers, is everything you don’t want in your hospitality staff: excitable, eccentric, violent, and violently snobbish.” (p. 22)

And this: 

“When housewife and mother Alison Braithwaite wins thirty-eight million pounds in the lottery, the first thing she doesn’t do is tell her family.” (p. 74) 

When this depth of knowledge is delivered with warmth and humor and exuberance, you’ve got yourself a book that’s a complete pleasure to read. It’s a wildly pleasant place to hang out. 

Give this book a whirl if you like… British television series, lively writing style, finding TV series similar to your favorites, a warm tone

What are your favorite British TV shows? 

(Review copy provided by the author in exchange for a fair and honest review)

Book pairings: sociopaths

Nonfiction November rages on, and today’s topic is… 

Book Pairing, hosted by Sarah of Sarah’s Bookshelves : This week, pair up a nonfiction book with a fiction title. It can be a “If you loved this book, read this!” or just two titles that you think would go well together. Maybe it’s a historical novel and you’d like to get the real history by reading a nonfiction version of the story.

Today we’re getting grim, my friends, because: sociopaths. 

Yes, we’re talking about the true story of Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos, the totally bogus biotech company she led — and the people whose lives she damaged because they crossed her. It’s creepy, it’s chilling, it’s disturbing as all get-out. And the fact that it’s true makes it all the more unsettling. 

So our nonfiction title today is Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou. 

Bad Blood pairs nicely with My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite. While this novel has a bit of a cheeky tone, it’s suspenseful and all too maddening to watch the sociopathic sister (yes, an actual serial killer) get away with murder. 

Both books contain situations that are downright infuriating, because the gall! The audaciousness of their behavior is shocking. They also both deal with issues of integrity and loyalty and complicity. And both can be deeply disturbing. 

 

So if you’re a sensitive soul, these books are not good for bedtime reading. While they’re not scary, they’re unsettling. (I had a troubled night of sleep after reading a chapter of Bad Blood at bedtime — and afterward would read it only during daylight hours. Because this stuff is true, and it’s seriously messed up.)

 

Anyone else moderately (yet not unpleasantly) disturbed by these books?

What I’ve been reading: October 2019

October: in with some sunshine, out with a snowstorm. It’s been a beautiful and wildly busy month, and my reading time feels like it’s been diminished. (Real life, you seriously can get in the way of my reading.)

This month has felt fiction-rich, which is somewhat unusual. Also strange: I read a true crime book. This only happens about once a decade, so: notable.

There also was a grim tone to several of the books I read in October, which maybe could be seen as seasonally appropriate.

Favorite of the month: The Dutch House by Ann Patchett. Her ability to weave a complex and believable story stuns me every time.

Here’s a look at October’s books…

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

3 words: lyrical, moving, quietly suspenseful

Give this book a whirl if you like… stories of difficult childhoods, evocative swampy settings, solitude, mysteries that unfold slowly

I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer by Michelle McNamara

3 words: haunting, investigative, deep dive

Give this book a whirl if you like… true crime blended with memoir, stories of obsessive research, scary true crime stories, author as part of the narrative

Red at the Bone by Jacqueline Woodson

3 words: lyrical, impressionistic, nuanced

Give this book a whirl if you like… stories told through vignettes, African American family, #ownvoices, subtle character portraits, multiple generations of family dynamics, books that are short but powerful, teenage pregnancy

The Dutch House by Ann Patchett

3 words: character-driven, engaging, family 

Give this book a whirl if you like… stories of family drama, house as a character, supportive siblings, evil stepmother, layers of meaning 

The Lost Girls by Heather Young

3 words: forboding, atmospheric, suspenseful

Give this book a whirl if you like… novels that alternate between past and present, family mysteries, sisterhood, small towns, northern Minnesota, family cabins, secrets from the past

Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking when the Stakes Are High by Kerry Patterson et al

3 words: practical, encouraging, actionable

Give this book a whirl if you like… specific tactics for discussing difficult topics, ways to reframe stressful conversations

The Boron Letters by Gary C. Halbert

3 words: practical, insightful, straightforward

Give this book a whirl if you like… learning about copywriting, the psychology of marketing

Cozy White Cottage: 100 Ways to Love the Feeling of Being Home by Liz Marie Galvan

3 words: beautiful, practical, inspiring 

Give this book a whirl if you like… the rustic farmhouse look, tips for flea market buys, beautiful photos and a warm tone

 

What were your favorite books in October? And what are you looking forward to reading in November?

My year in nonfiction

My friends, it’s Nonfiction November, which is practically its own holiday season. This is week one, and we’re starting out with this happy topic… 

 

Your Year in Nonfiction, hosted by Julz of JulzReads: Take a look back at your year of nonfiction and reflect on the following questions – What was your favorite nonfiction read of the year? Do you have a particular topic you’ve been attracted to more this year? What nonfiction book have you recommended the most? What are you hoping to get out of participating in Nonfiction November?

Nonfiction books I've read this year

  • From the Corner of the Oval by Beck Dorey-Stein
  • Kitchen Yarns by Ann Hood
  • Rocket Men by Robert Kurson
  • Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl
  • Textbook Amy Krouse Rosenthal by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
  • The Greatest Love Story Ever Told by Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman
  • Bad Blood by John Carreyrou
  • Leaders Eat Last by Simon Sinek
  • Dear Ijeawele by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  • Can’t Nothing Bring Me Down by Ida Keeling with Anita Diggs
  • Outer Order, Inner Calm by Gretchen Rubin
  • Digital Minimalism by Cal Newport
  • Simple Organizing Wisdom edited by Laurie Jennings
  • The Complete Book of Home Organization by Toni Hammersley
  • The Home Edit by Clea Shearer and Joanna Teplin
  • Little Town in a Big Woods by Marilyn Robinson
  • Beautifully Organized by Nikki Boyd
  • The Making of a Manager by Julie Zhuo
  • Working by Robert A. Caro
  • My Life in Middlemarch by Rebecca Mead
  • Gunflint Burning by Cary Griffith
  • Mindset by Carol Dweck
  • The Art of Gathering by Priya Parker
  • Southern Lady Code by Helen Ellis
  • Everybody’s Got Something by Robin Roberts
  • Dress Like a Woman by Abrams Books
  • The Heart of Librarianship by Michael Stephens
  • I Miss You When I Blink by Mary Laura Philpott
  • Get Better by Todd Davis
  • Happy by Design by Victoria Harrison
  • Fall and Rise by Mitchell Zuckoff
  • The Worry Cure by Robert L. Leahy
  • Work Optional by Tanja Hester
  • Keeping House by Emma Bloomsfield
  • This Is Where You Belong by Melody Warnick
  • Talking to Strangers by Malcolm Gladwell
  • I’ll Be Gone in the Dark by Michelle McNamara
  • Crucial Conversations by Kerry Patterson et al

Favorite nonfiction book of the year

Watch how I cheat at this question by telling you the tortured story of how I made my selection…  

When I reviewed my list of books read thus far this year, I immediately wrote down Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl, because: life-changingly important and profound.

Then I kept scanning, and added Textbook Amy Krouse Rosenthal (by Amy Krouse Rosenthal) to the list, because: so creative and life-affirming and funny.

And then I kept going and wrote down The Art of Gathering by Priya Parker, because: fascinating and helpful and relevant.

And then I decided on Textbook Amy Krouse Rosenthal, because it was unlike anything else I’d ever read.

Topic I’ve been reading about an awful lot

This year, I’ve read an unnatural number of books about home organization, decor, and design. There’s another one on the nightstand right this minute, because what could be better before-sleep reading than a gorgeous home decor book? (Check back in a couple of weeks, cuz those home decor books are coming back as a topic…)

Nonfiction book I’ve recommended the most

This is probably a tie between Textbook Amy Krouse Rosenthal and The Art of Gathering

Goals for Nonfiction November

I love this event every year, because nonfiction is truly my happiest place. (Fiction: love you, too, darling.) My goals are to revel in the nonfiction enthusiasm of my fellow readers and to find some new nonfiction delights.

So, good people…  who else is in on the Nonfiction November excitement?

Currently in the thick of things

People, things are busy! I know this is no surprise to any of us, because who doesn’t feel that way? But some months just take it to the next level.

That said, I’m not complaining.

Here’s a bit of the good stuff happening here, much of which is distracting me away from reading and blogging…

Meeting | …our new nephew pup! Last weekend was devoted to family and dogs, and we’re besotted with the new little guy and his big brother.

Listening | …to the spectacular podcast The Happiness Lab. I keep talking about it. All the time.

Reading | Citizen Reader’s fantastic new book Bingeworthy British Television. I keep picking it up, intending to read about only one or two TV shows. And then I’ve spent 20 minutes downing bunches of them. Warning: addictive properties.

Waiting | …for our cat to warm up to her fancy new bed. It’s the cutest thing ever, and she’s just not into it. Literally.

I’ve been attempting to entice her, using her favorite toy (Christmas gift from her auntie), and she’s approached only to rescue unicorn from the perils of the cozy bed.

So, good people… anyone else engaged in a gentle battle of wills with a feline? What’s cooking in your life this October?

Books I can’t wait to read: fall 2019

Excited about the weeks and months ahead, because look at this hold list… So many great books I’m anticipating…

 

  • Everything Is Figureoutable by Marie Forleo
  • The Girl Who Reads on the Metro by Christine Feret-Fleury
  • Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid
  • The Infinite Game by Simon Sinek
  • Indistractable by Nir Eyal
  • Tiny Habits by B.J. Fogg

 

What books are on your library holds list this fall?

Love Where You Live: Next Level

When I first read This Is Where You Belong: The Art and Science of Loving the Place You Live by Melody Warnick, I tested out some of the recommendations in the book and found that they boosted my happiness with my home.

 

Now, in our first year in our new home, we’ve taken it to the next level. I re-read the book and marked so many pages, and we took some serious action. Here’s what we’ve accomplished so far…

 

We’ve walked to the farmers market several times and bought fresh produce (corn grown 20 miles from our home!) and flowers

 

 

We walked to a great restaurant downtown (1 mile away) and ate on their patio on a beautiful late summer evening

We’re exploring all the local pizza places

 

 

We’ve attended lectures with friends at a large local venue

 

 

I greet everyone I see on the running path (and sometimes we recognize each other)

 

We’ve taken family and friends for walks along the riverwalk in our town

 

We researched the history of our house

 

We bought vintage and handcrafted home goods from a wonderful local boutique

  • I’ve walked to work 
  • We’ve gone to several local craft markets
  • We stroll our historic neighborhood
  • We’ve explored the cemetery nearest to our house and found the names of old local families
  • We’ve visited the local history museum 
  • We stop and chat with neighbors 
  • We strolled around downtown during Second Fridays — when local businesses are open late 
  • We bought locally roasted coffee
  • We bought and are reading books about our city’s history

All of these things have deepened our connection to our new town. It’s truly a boost to happiness, to the point that sometimes I just hum with joy.

As the Dear Man often says, with such warm fondness, “You love this town.” And I respond, “I love this town.” And then we smile. It’s like a civic commercial without an audience.

 

I’m grateful to Melody Warnick for providing such a fine road map to “love where you live” happiness.

What activities make you love the place you live?

Currently… falling into fall

It’s fall, and it’s lovely (even when it’s thunderstorming), and this has been a season of great happiness. Prepare for multiple mentions of my becoming verklempt… 

 

Reading  |  I’ve been in the midst of an extremely satisfying fiction spree lately: The Most Fun We Ever Had by Claire Lombardo and The Dutch House by Ann Patchett. Such wonderful stories to sink into…

Listening   |  A friend alerted me to the 13 Minutes to the Moon podcast, and I fell for it hard. It focuses on the 13 minutes before the Apollo 11 moon landing, and the host interviews astronauts and flight controllers who were part of the radio loop when it happened. By the final three episodes, when they play back the 13 minutes of radio chatter and you know the behind-the-scenes stories: so very verklempt.

Watching   |  My Dear SIL and I are Downton Abbey superfans, so we went to see the recently-released movie, Downton Abbey. Just like the TV show, the movie was gorgeous and dramatic and super soap-y, and we loved it. 

Working on  |   This year we upped our game in the fall decor arena.  Here’s the kitchen island…

Loving  |   I’m wild about molasses cookies, and I’ve embarked on a quest to find The Best Molasses Cookie Recipe in the World. Two recipes down, with a clear frontrunner. If you have a stellar recipe, I’m gonna need for you to send it to me. (Please.) 

Anticipating  |   My sister’s family added a baby St. Bernard to their menagerie, and we get to meet him soon! I keep shivering with joy. Also: walking around the house laugh-crying as the first photos arrived, showing him with my niece and nephew. My heart can barely take it.  

 

 

Celebrating  |  One year in our new house!

What’s going on in your world this fall?

Favorite coffee | National Coffee Day

 

Today’s National Coffee Day, and I don’t know about you, but I’m celebrating. 

 

Here are some of my coffee favorites…

Favorite national chain: Dunkin'

That time someone Random Acted me & paid for my coffee in the drive-thru

 

For perfect coffee every single time, I love Dunkin’. Their prices are decent, they have a great app, and you can earn points for free coffee. So much to love.

Favorite coffee beans (grocery store)

I’m all about brewing my own coffee at home because frugal.

Here are my favorite go-to brands:

  • Trader Joe’s — Columbia Supremo
  • Cameron’s — Organic Woods & Water

Favorite coffee beans (local source)

We live in an area of coffee greatness. Some local area favorites:

  • Gun Barrel Coffee — Hooah
  • PapaNicholas — Restaurant Blend

My fellow coffee drinkers… tell me your favorites!